Three on a Thursday in Dublin – Dalkey
May 23, 2019
Glasnevin Cemetery is well-worth the visit according to Oscars International.
Three on Thursday – Glasnevin
May 31, 2019

At Oscars International our teachers and academic staff are passionate about teaching and delivering the best English Language experience for our students. We love English and we decided we wanted to find out how our teachers and academic staff felt about the language that they sleep, eat and breathe and why they love it. What is it about the language that makes us sing in front of students, tell them so much about ourselves and ultimately share our life experiences with them.

Some of our teachers give us their thoughts.

Why do we love English?

Oscars International English Language School Dublin

Aidan O’Shea

I love malapropisms, double entendres and non sequiturs the most. I love more that English stole all of those words.

Aidan O’Shea, School Principal

For me, the thing I love the most about English is the word preposterous. It is a word that has no direct translation and trying to understand it was what really made me want to speak better English and to improve my vocabulary. English vocabulary feels more broad and often more nuanced than Spanish. To this day it remains my favorite word.

Fernando Bajo, Student Services

Miriam and John sing the hit song Prepositions at Friday Karaoke

English has always been a sort of a bridge to me; the bridge between cultures and the stories they tell.  English splits my soul and mind in two as it’s one of the two languages I think in.

I love English for its annoying fixed phrases, the intricate grammar rules, however, most of all, for the intercultural communication opportunities that no other language currently provides.

Natalie Wiertel, Director of Studies

 

The treachery of phrasal verbs, but it’s always better to be pissed off than to be pissed on

John E Kelleher, Teacher

Oscars International

Neil Davison at home in Scotland…och aye!

I like the fact that we’re still using a 15th century spelling system that bears little resemblance to current usage. It makes any arguments about “correct pronunciation” redundant.

Neil Davison, Academic Coordinator

I love the English language because of Shakespeare, Virgina Woolfe, Tennessee Williams, Oscar Wilde, Brecht,  WB Yeats, Angela Carter, Sylvia Plath, the Brothers Grimm, Maya Angelou, Dorris Lessing, Anne Michaels, Seamus Heaney, Eavan Boland,  Dorothy Parker …the list goes on and on!

Issy Sabongi, Senior Teacher

I love English because it’s the only language I can speak fluently. Hating it and having to speak it would be silly, right? That said, I’m a sucker for a good pun, and English offers a never ending supply of punnable opportunities. I also love the way it is continually evolving to incorporate new words – “punnable” anyone?

Nicola Noller, Teacher

Oscars International English Language School Dublin

John Perry (back left) with his class

I love English because it’s funky, flexible and friendly – you can take it all over the world with you.

John Perry, Senior Teacher

I love English because although there are rules, it constantly tries to break them, meaning the key to mastering it is not to know the mechanics of it, but the feel of it. It’s a language built on variation, deviation, evolution and emotion.

Toby Lawson, Teacher

I love English because of the fun I get from mispronunciations, misunderstanding of meanings and the evolution of language or what I call ‘street’ English. I am inspired by the local and the colloquial and how it travels; ‘craic’, ‘grand’ and so on.

As an artist I find constant stimulus in the most banal of conversations or situations. I also revel in the development of my students’ abilities. When we reach a level advanced enough for the in-jokes to begin it’s hard to wipe the silly grin off my face. This week’s example – squirrel – squirdel, with a ‘t’.

Sarah O’Connor, Teacher

I love how onomatopoeic it is: pop, ooze, bubble, slime, squeal, grunt-its a very expressive language.

Miriam Stewart, Head of Drama